Mummelad: The Sweet Swedish Treat

Mummelad

You’ve probably never heard of mummelad, but this sweet Swedish treat is about to rock your world. Mummelad is a classic Scandinavian dessert that your taste buds will thank you for discovering. Made from mashed potatoes, butter, sugar, and spices like cardamom and cinnamon, mummelad is a delicious pudding-like dish that will satisfy your craving for something rich and creamy.

The best part is how easy it is to make. In just a few simple steps, you’ll be enjoying a bowl of mummelad in under 30 minutes. Comforting, decadent, and perfect for a chilly night, mummelad is the Swedish dessert you never knew you needed in your life until now. Grab your potato masher and get ready to fall in love with this sweet and creamy Scandinavian classic. Mummelad is about to become your new favorite treat.

What Is Mummelad?

Mummelad is a traditional Swedish fruit spread, similar to jam or preserves. It’s a sweet treat that is often enjoyed in Sweden. Mummelad is made from fruits and commonly used as a topping or filling for pastries and desserts.

What exactly is Mummelad?

Mummelad is made from mashed or chopped fruit, sugar, and sometimes pectin or starch to help it gel. The fruit is cooked down until thick and spreadable. Some of the most popular fruits used are strawberries, cherries, raspberries, and gooseberries.

Unlike jam which uses crushed fruit, Mummelad contains small chunks of fruit. It has a looser, chunkier consistency than jam. The sugar content is also generally lower than in jam, allowing the fresh fruit flavor to shine through.

Mummelad can be enjoyed in many of the same ways as jam – on bread, scones, or toast, or as a filling in pastries. However, its chunky texture means it works best spread on slightly firmer bases. Mummelad also pairs excellently with cheese, especially creamy cheeses like goat cheese or ricotta.

For a traditional Swedish experience, enjoy Mummelad on a buttery kaffebröd, or coffee bread. This sweet pastry is ideal for topping with a spoonful of Mummelad and a dollop of whipped cream. A cup of strong coffee completes this classic Swedish fika, or coffee break.

Mummelad is a delicious part of Sweden’s food heritage. Once you try this fruity spread, you’ll understand why it’s so beloved in Scandinavian culture. Whip up a batch and enjoy!

The History of Mummelad in Sweden

Mummelad has been a sweet part of Swedish culture for centuries. This fruit-based treat traces its origins back to ancient times, when Swedes would enjoy it during Midsummer celebrations. Over the years, Mummelad has evolved into an integral part of festive traditions in Sweden.

The Early Days

Mummelad dates back to agrarian times in Sweden. During the summer solstice, Swedes would gather wild fruits like berries, apples, and plums to make preserves that could be enjoyed for months to come. These early versions of Mummelad were very basic, made of mashed or chopped fruit, honey, and sometimes vinegar.

A Seasonal Treat

By the 19th century, Mummelad became strongly associated with Christmas and Midsummer. As sugar became more widely available, recipes evolved to include more fruit and less honey. Regional variations developed based on locally available produce. Mummelad was a special, seasonal treat, with many families still making their own batches from foraged or homegrown fruit.

Modern Mummelad

Today, Mummelad comes in many commercial varieties and flavors. However, traditional versions made of strawberries, raspberries, apples, or plums remain most popular, especially homemade recipes passed down through generations. For many Swedes, Mummelad evokes feelings of nostalgia, warmth and togetherness. A spoonful of Mummelad is a bite of history and a taste of home.

Whether homemade or store-bought, Mummelad is the quintessential Swedish treat. This little pot of fruity deliciousness has been bringing people together for celebrations big and small for centuries.

Popular Flavors of Mummelad

Mummelad comes in a variety of delicious flavors to suit any taste. Whether you prefer fruity and tangy or rich and creamy, there’s a flavor of Mummelad for you.

Fruity Flavors

For those who love bright, fresh fruit flavors, the apricot and strawberry Mummelads are popular choices. Made from ripe apricots and sun-sweet strawberries, these spreadable fruit butters highlight the natural flavors of the fruit. The apricot version has a vibrant orange color and a tart-sweet flavor with notes of citrus. The strawberry Mummelad is a stunning pink and tastes like ripe strawberries plucked straight from the field.

Savory Flavors

If you prefer savory over sweet, the tomato and chili pepper Mummelads might be more your style. The tomato Mummelad has a beautiful red-orange hue and a rich, tangy flavor of sun-dried tomatoes. It’s delicious served as a spread on crusty bread or used as a condiment for meats like pork or duck. The chili pepper Mummelad packs some heat, with flavors of red chili peppers, garlic, and spices. Use sparingly as a spicy sandwich spread or condiment for Tex-Mex dishes.

Decadent Flavors

For special occasions, you can’t beat the decadent mint chocolate chip or cotton candy Mummelads. The mint chocolate chip Mummelad has the flavor of mint chocolate chip ice cream, with bits of chocolate throughout a minty base. The cotton candy Mummelad tastes just like the pink spun-sugar treat from carnivals and fairs. These whimsical flavors are perfect for slathering on pancakes, waffles or toast.

With so many wonderful flavors, Mummelad has something for every taste and every occasion. No wonder it has become such a sensation in the culinary world! Try the different varieties and find your new favorite flavor of this sweet Swedish treat.

How to Make Homemade Mummelad

Making homemade mummelad is easier than you might think. All you need are a few simple ingredients and some time to simmer the fruit. The result is a sweet jam perfect for toast, scones, or pastries.

To get started, gather:

  • 4 pounds of fruit (apples, berries, stone fruit), washed, cored, and chopped
  • 1 1/2 to 2 cups of sugar, depending on how sweet you want it. For tart fruit like raspberries, use the full 2 cups. For naturally sweeter fruit like peaches, use closer to 1 1/2 cups.
  • The juice from half a lemon (optional, adds pectin to help the jam set)

Instructions:

  1. Combine the chopped fruit, sugar, and lemon juice (if using) in a large pot. Gently mash some of the fruit with a potato masher to release its juices.
  2. Place the pot over medium heat and bring to a gentle simmer, stirring frequently. Cook, stirring regularly, until the sugar has dissolved and the fruit has released its juices, about 10 minutes.
  3. Once simmering, reduce the heat to medium-low. Partially cover and continue cooking, stirring occasionally, until the fruit has softened and the liquid has reduced by about half, 30 to 40 minutes.
  4. To test if the jam has set, place a spoonful of it in the freezer for a few minutes. If it firms up, it’s ready. If not, continue cooking and retesting every 10 minutes until it does.
  5. Once set, remove from heat and let cool completely. Your homemade mummelad can be stored in sterilized jars in the refrigerator for up to 1 month. For longer shelf life, seal the jars in a hot water bath according to canning instructions.

Making your own mummelad is extremely rewarding. Not only does it taste far better than store-bought, but you can customize the recipe to your taste and have fun with different fruit combinations. Enjoy your homemade mummelad – you deserve it!

Where to Find Mummelad in the US

Mummelad can be found in specialty food stores across the United States, especially those that offer imported gourmet and artisanal goods. Many farmers markets, especially in areas with a strong Scandinavian cultural influence, will also carry mummelad from local producers.

Specialty Grocery Stores

Stores like Whole Foods, Trader Joe’s, and Wegmans are likely to stock mummelad, especially flavors like black currant, gooseberry, and rhubarb. Some locations may carry additional varieties depending on regional tastes. These larger chains have the ability to import mummelad from Sweden to offer authentic options.

Farmers Markets and Local Producers

Farmers markets are a great place to find mummelad made locally using traditional Swedish recipes. Cities like New York, Brooklyn, Staten Island, and Queens have large populations of Swedish immigrants, so you may be able to find mummelad at markets there, as well as in other places where residents value artisanal and imported goods. Look for signs advertising ‘Swedish preserves’ or ‘Scandinavian specialties.’ Local producers are more likely to experiment with unique flavor combinations using locally-sourced ingredients.

Ordering Online

If you have trouble finding mummelad in stores near you, consider ordering it online. Websites like ScandinavianFoodStore.com, IKEA.com, and TotallySwedish.com offer mummelad that can be shipped to anywhere in the US. Flavors available online are more limited but usually include traditional varieties like lingonberry, cloudberry, and sea buckthorn. Ordering a variety pack is a great way to sample different flavors.

The availability of mummelad in the US is widespread, so whether you shop locally or order online, you should be able to satisfy your craving for this sweet Swedish treat. Varieties and flavors will differ depending on where you purchase from, so trying mummelad from different producers is part of the fun. Happy hunting and smaklig måltid!

Conclusion

So there you have it, everything you ever wanted to know about mummelad. This decadent Swedish treat is worth discovering. Next time you’re craving something sweet, skip the cake or cookies and give mummelad a try. With its creamy texture and complex flavors of nuts, sugar, and fruit, it’s sure to satisfy your sweet tooth in a totally new way. And the best part is, with only a few basic ingredients, you can easily make your own batch of mummelad at home. Whip up a bowl of mummelad, grab a spoon, and enjoy a taste of Sweden. Your taste buds will thank you.

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